Zimmerman Trial Commentary WCAU TV 2013 07 12 5PM

Writen by: on July 25, 2013

VIDEO TRANSCRIPT:

Alright, the big news today out of Stanford, the jury has started deliberating in the murder trial of neighborhood watch volunteer George Zimmerman. He’s accused of killed Treyvon Martin. Zimmerman shot and killed 17 year old Martin last year. He’s charges with second degree murder and he has pleaded not guilty saying that he acted in self-defense but the jury is also allowed to consider manslaughter in this case. A conviction on either count could mean life in prison for Zimmerman. A defense lawyer from our area, Enrique Latoison, joins us live now to weigh in on this trial. Enrique is in out digital operations center. Enrique, thanks for being here this evening.

Thank you

Alright, so, first of all, there are no eye witnesses to what happened there in Safford on that night. So, what are jurors really relying on to decide is Zimmerman is guilty?

Well, they are going to have to rely on the physical evidence. I mean, there were pictures of Mr. Zimmerman’s injuries. They are definitely going to pay close attention to the actual words of Mr. Zimmerman. You have to remember he did give a taped confession in this case. There also was a prosecution witness, which defense was really happy about that testified that Treyvon Martin was on top of Zimmerman throwing down MMA blows. So, they are going to rely on all those things.

Alright, now let’s talk about some of antics, the showmanship we saw in the courtroom there today Enrique during those closing arguments. We had the defense attorney coming in with this piece of concrete and putting it in front of the jury and insinuation that that was a weapon that Martin was indeed armed that night because he alleges, of course, that Martin used that to bash Zimmerman’s head in the head. Does the jury buy into this or is this just seen more of part of the show?

Well, I mean, the prosecution in this case also took three hours to do their closing. So, maybe the defense felt they needed to match the same amount of time. Three hours is a long time to keep the jury’s attention. I think we all agree though, if we are going to spend three hours talking to a jury, its better be dramatic and a lot of drama than to show them slides for three hours and bore them to death.

That’s certainly a lot of drama with him pausing for four minutes to imply that that’s the amount of time that Martin could’ve ran home instead of engaging in what happened that night. Now, Zimmerman’s attorneys are obviously trying to show that he acted in self-defense. Have they accomplished that goal?

Well, you have to remember, it’s the prosecutions burden to prove that George Zimmerman did not reasonably believe that he was in eminent danger of serious bodily injury or death and the prosecutions own closing could not exactly tell the jury exactly what happened. And, if you follow that theory, if the prosecution doesn’t know exactly what happened, that’s reasonable doubt. So, it would not be surprising if the jury, if they followed their oath exactly to the letter of the law that they acquit in this case.

Last question here real quick, we are dealing with a jury of six. Does that mean do you expect a quicker verdict in this case?
Yes, definitely. I think six is going to be a lot easier to agree than twelve. And, you know, I think in this case you’re going to have a much quicker verdict. I also think at this point three are closing by the prosecution and three are closing by the defense. I think they’ve heard everything they need to hear and they’re going to be coming to a pretty quick decision on this case.

And we wait for that verdict. Now, Enrique Latoison, defense lawyer from this area. Thank you for your time.

Thank you for having me.

Written by

Managing Partner and founder of Latoison Law, Enrique Latoison, Esq. represents a diverse portfolio of clientele, including individuals, families, businesses and working professionals, in all of their legal needs. You can find him on Google+ and facebook or write to him at [email protected]. Mr. Latoison earned his Juris Doctorate degree from the James E. Beasley School of Law at Temple University, where he received awards in class excellence and accolades in distinguished class performance and outstanding trial advocacy.